Join us for the October edition of the PDF series on 10/17 at 6:30. Moon will be screening with a cocktail pairing as well as lively conversation after the film.
With its evocations of 2001, Silent Running, and Blade Runner, Moon is an homage to classic science fiction that raises fascinating questions about technology and the human condition, questions that are all too relevant still today. As A. O. Scott observed in his review, Moon is “a drama whose central problem is what a single human identity might entail in a world where both cloning and highly exploitative impersonal labor practices have become commonplace.” Intertwining themes of biotechnology, global capitalism, and human identity, Moon forces us to confront difficult questions:
  • Is there a place for the human being in advanced technological systems?
  • Are we being dehumanized by our technologies?
  • What becomes of us when we’re able to clone human beings?
  • What kind of status would human clones enjoy?
  • What makes you you, especially as you confront your doppelgänger?
If you’d like to dip your (non-cloned human) toes into some background material exploring some of the philosophical themes raised by Moon, check out some of the following links.

If you’re looking for a more positive and uplifting vision of cloning, you might check out this clip from the terrific BBC series Orphan Black (one of my favorite TV series!). Sarah and her “sestras” perhaps provide a strong antidote to Kass’ argument about the repugnance of cloning.